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Why the future is workless

In this work, or rather debate, Tim Dunlop raises many points which, while they may appear to be somewhat ‘left of centre’, could in reality, be the new future of generations yet to come.

In a world where the old ways are fast giving over to the new and as technology advances at a rate that was once only touted in cartoon series, there is much to be considered as robotic technology sees many industries taking over this cost effective manner of producing goods, leaving a great and a gaping hole in the traditional work or jobs market, one which governments are struggling to fill with innovative employment ideas.

Much discussion has already been held about the basic income scheme, which has over the years been mooted by many forward thinking government’s, which roughly translates to everyone receiving a basic rate of pay, thereby solving the inequality issues so prevalent in modern society and by doing so, will help alleviate poverty, create a better work life balance and see more people employed.

This scheme is being trialled in countries where poverty and living below the poverty line is sadly an accepted component of life, with some considerable success. Further research and monitoring for long term sustainability is still being carried out and assessed. It would appear there is considerably more research to be done in this area as to its feasibility on a worldwide scale.

There is also the part-time work platform that has seen considerable discussion, where the working public are employed on what is now considered as a part-time basis, receiving a fair and liveable wage for their efforts.  In many areas this is now becoming the ‘norm’ rather than the exception. Rather than thinking this is a temporary state of affairs, thought should be given to the very real consideration that perhaps this is now the ‘norm’, rather than the exception.

If,(and it most likely is) this is the way of the future, what then should be some of the changes that will need to be made within the societal structures of our countries, communities and political arenas  which will allow people to live a happy and fulfilling live.

At this point in evolution, society in general is seeing the rise of massive wealth, spread worldwide, which in turn creates massive poverty, also worldwide, as eventually the balance topples creating a form of ‘dystopia’ which in many instances, is already happening in countries that are considered forward thinking, have a generalised standard of living and create many opportunities for economic growth.

Is there an alternative to work? Yes there is, but it does eventually come down to what it is exactly that you do consider as ‘work’ and how well you are going to be able to accept and adapt to the changes that are here and amongst us already.

The work is provocative in that it makes you consider options, challenges your regulated and controlled way of thinking and presents a future which while vastly different to today’s world, could and already is to a degree, very real and very much here with us all.

Author In this work, or rather debate Tim Dunlop raises many points which, while they may appear to be somewhat ‘left of centre’, could in reality, be the new future of generations yet to come. In a world where the old ways are fast giving over to the new and as technology advances at a rate that was once only touted in cartoon series, there is much to be considered as robotic technology sees many industries taking over this cost effective manner of producing goods, leaving a great and a gaping hole in the traditional work or jobs market, one which governments are struggling to fill with innovative employment ideas. Much discussion has already been held about the basic income scheme, which has over the years been mooted by many forward thinking government’s, which roughly translates to everyone receiving a basic rate of pay, thereby solving the inequality issues so prevalent in modern society and by doing so, will help alleviate poverty, create a better work life balance and see more people employed. This scheme is being trialled in countries where poverty and living below the poverty line is with some considerable success. Further research and monitoring for long term sustainability is still being carried out and assessed. . It would appear there is considerably more research to be done in this area as to its feasibility on a worldwide scale. There is also the part-time work platform that has seen considerable discussion, where the working public are employed on what is now considered as a part-time basis, receiving a fair and liveable wage for their efforts. In many areas this is now becoming the ‘norm’ rather than the exception. Rather than thinking this is a temporary state of affairs, thought should be given to the very real consideration that perhaps this is now the ‘norm’, rather than the exception. If,( and it most like is) this is the way of the future, what then should be some of the changes that will need to be made within the societal structures of our countries, communities and political arenas which will allow people to live a happy and fulfilling live. At this point in evolution, society in general is seeing the rise of massive wealth, spread worldwide, which in turn creates massive poverty, also worldwide, as eventually the balance topples creating a form of ‘dystopia’ which in many instances, is already happening in countries that are considered forward thinking, have a generalised standard of living and create many opportunities for economic growth. Is there an alternative to work? Yes there is but it does eventually come down to what it is exactly that you do consider as ‘work’ and how well you are going to be able to accept and adapt to the changes that are here and amongst us already. The work is provocative in that it makes you consider options, challenges your regulated and controlled way of thinking and presents a future which while vastly different to today’s world, could and already is to a degree, very real and very much here with us all.
Publisher New South Publishers
ISBN 9781742234823
Website http:/www.newsouthbooks.com,au
Distributor New South Books
Released September 2016