Helena Dixon
A Miss Underhay Mystery Book 16 It is 1936 and Europe is in a state of unease. France has just...
Verity Bright
A Lady Eleanor Swift Mystery Book 17 Lady Eleanor ‘Ellie’ Swift is taking a holiday in Europe arriving in Venice...
Denise Brown
It all Started with a Lie is a stunning novel from Denise Brown that looks at secrets held deep within...
KT Carlisle
Mia is dead and her close group of friends can’t work out what happened. The Police believe it is suicide,...
Christine Mangan
The story line and setting in The Continental Affair are quite captivating. The characters move from Spain to France and...
Fleur McDonald
Sassie was in a rush to get back home; her brother Abe had called her to come as quickly as...
Robert Galbraith
‘The Ink Black Heart’, is the sixth in the Strike novels by JK Rowling under her pseudonym Robert Galbraith, which...
Adriane Howell
Adriane Howell, has out of a diverse collection of bit and pieces, crafted a novel that is bordering on the...
Petronella McGovern
The Good Teacher, the second book from acclaimed story teller Petronella McGovern sets the stage for another cliff hanger of...
Sujata Massey
The Satapur Moonstone, the second book in the Bombay Mystery series from Sujata Massey is very exciting to read, with...
Nicole Hurley-Moore
Lawson’s Bend is small town struggling to escape from the past; a town portrayed in its poignant reality as the...
Emily O'Grady
Cub, or Coralie is a twin who lives in a broken down property in the country. Her family consist of...
Jack Heath
This is definitely not one for the faint hearted, but for those who love a little meat in their story,...
Sarah Bailey
The Dark Lake is a strong exemplar of how a well written murder/mystery should be produced. The novel is structured...
LS Hilton
Following on from her phenomenal first novel, Maestra, LS Hilton continues Judith’s journey, now known as Elisabeth Teerlinc, as she...
Delphine De Vigan
Based on a True Story, is described as Autobiographical Fiction, and the author says “Unable to free myself completely from...
Thalassophobia is a fear of the open sea and large bodies of water. The Windy Season is probably a book such phobic will either want to steer clear of – or more likely immerse themselves in for the morbidity of its depiction of the ocean’s vastness. A Western Australian sojourn by Sam Carmody, The Windy Season is set around the coastline and young Paul, whose older brother, Elliot, goes missing from a fishing town aptly named Stark. Paul follows the ghost of his brother to the town, doggedly continuing to search for Elliot, while taking his place working on his cousin’s Cray fishing boat. He learns the precarious secrets that many residents of the town hold while witnessing the unforgiving nature of the sea. Interspersed with Paul’s harsh lessons about the coast are anonymous entries of a member of a bikie gang caught up in a police sting fleeing across central Australia in tense, hurried bursts. Sam Carmody has created a portrait of life on the sea both bleak and beautiful. He grasps the tangible power and frightening splendour of the places where ocean meets sparse human populations through Paul’s story. The sea is definitely its own living entity in the text, powerful and a constant reminder of human frailty against the elemental and unforgiving ocean. A strong sense of loneliness pervades the opening of the book, the atmosphere of Stark feels like a peculiar and real reflection of the nature of isolated small towns. Carmody’s clear intimacy with these kind of small Western Australian towns adds a reality to the scenery and figures that pepper the background of the text. The town policewoman describes a town “moving after it’s dead,” Stark’s methamphetamines use so pervasive it “was like the bacteria that flushes a corpse.” When compared with the secondary narrative thread of a young man involved in bikie drug dealing, it becomes obvious Carmody is painting an interesting portrait of a town not only sinking, but drowning at the hands of its meth problem. The stylistic choice not to use quotation marks gives the book a breathless feel, at times a little confusing but ultimately adding to the feeling of being uneasily adrift in Carmody’s sea of words. This story also has a smell – Carmody appeals to the close nature of scent and memory as a motif in the book, its strong olfactory imagery portraying places and types of people with at times shocking accuracy. The shark motif used throughout is also an interesting one. They are at once symbols of unspoken fears and manifest human failing. Paul is terrified of the creatures; to him they are the fear of things he does not understand – his brother and the sea. Carmody’s combination of a maritime bildungsroman and a missing person story is a unique creation, a perceptive and consummate piece of storytelling.
Thalassophobia is a fear of the open sea and large bodies of water. The Windy Season is probably a book...
Chris Pavone
Will Rhodes is on assignment at a luxury Argentinian Resort, wine flowing free and food of the finest quality served,...
Luke Devenish
 The story commences with Miss Matilda Gregory looking to hire a new maid. Ida Garfield, longing for a chance to...
Michael Kurland
This is a wonderful ‘Who Dunn-it’ written in the best of the tradition bringing the world of 1930's  New York,...
L.S. Hilton
This book is described on the cover as a thriller. And it is, although the thrilling bits are interspersed with...
Peter Corris
Cliff Hardy is in a reflective mood, looking back over his career and the people he has had dealings with,when...
Kristina Ohlssen
This novel exudes authenticity, and not surprisingly, one finds out that Kristina was employed as a counter-terrorism expert in Vienna....
Sophie McKenzie
This is indeed a compelling read, and certain to have you thinking.....just one more page. There is a death, doubt...