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Reviewed By  Janet Mawdesley       December 2, 2014

 

Author  Patrick Holland Illustrations by Junko Azukawa

Distributor:     
ISBN:                 9781921924774
Publisher:         Transit Lounge
Release Date:    

Website:    http://www.transitlounge.com 

Disturbing and haunting the tale of Saint Brendan of Clonfert, a sixth century monk and adventurer, as told by Patrick Holland will stay with you for a very long time. As you read you realise it is more a puzzle of the mind, a view into the window of morals and ethics, which can be translated into the challenges that face you as you travel through life.

Saint Brendan and his friends’ set sail in a small currah on a legendary quest to find the Isle of the Blessed. Along the way they face all the challenges of evil, lust, laziness and temptation. The sea is often against them, shredding their sails, claiming the lives of fellow travellers but always, when Brendan and his followers are at their lowest ebb, the sea casts them upon another shore.

Their journey is legendary in so far as they come across the many and varied temptations sent to them by Satan to test their strength and beliefs before and during their journey to their next destination.

The many conversations Brendan has with Satan are very enlightening: created to deliver an understanding of good over evil, but also to cast light on the many difficult choices that are presented on a life journey.  His manner of addressing the night sky when needing to work through just why the many challenges are presented to him is for deep contemplation as was then, as is now, the night sky will often hold many of the answers

This is not a book to be read in a hurry or from cover to cover in one sitting, but to be absorbed, piece by piece, allowing the words to settle and present the lesson.

Beautifully Illustrated by Japanese-Australian artist Junko Akaka, this is a work which should be treasured and used when troubled or in need of reassurance that even in the darkest of hours, when all seems to be despair, with the coming of the dawn there is always a new beginning.